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What you need to know about parental alienation

On Behalf of | Nov 17, 2021 | Child Custody

Child custody cases can get complicated. Usually, the court determines custody based on the best interests of the child. However, given the circumstances surrounding a divorce, it is not uncommon for a parent to seek sole custody of the children.

In some cases, the custodial parent may manipulate the child into believing the other parent is not a good person. This is known as parental alienation, and it may have adverse effects on the child’s wellbeing and their relationship with the alienated parent. In addition, some of the psychosocial effects of parental alienation may stretch beyond childhood. For example, the affected children may suffer from substance abuse, depression, and other mental issues later on.

What can you do about parental alienation?

It is essential to document any disparaging remarks made by your co-parent. If they send out elusive texts or resentful voicemails, you should not get rid of them entirely. Instead, store them in a place where you can retrieve them if need be. They can serve as evidence of parental alienation. Furthermore, do not forget to document social media posts that are disparaging towards you.

In addition, it is advisable to take note of any change in your child’s behavior or temperament. Children may not know how to pretend, and if they have been led into believing you are a bad person, it will be apparent in their actions. Anything you say or do will likely be met with dissent or disapproval. This is one of the hallmarks of parental alienation.

Protect your child’s wellbeing by taking the proper steps

In severe cases, it may be necessary to take remedial measures, especially if alienation is ongoing. You may either deal with it by approaching the other parent, but you might also want to explore other options if that fails. Further courses of action could potentially include modifying current custody orders if that can stop the alienation.

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